I didn't think a city water pressure regulator was important until...

Wayne

Moderator
Staff member
I never had an internal water pressure regulator, nor did I think it was all that important, because our Airstream has a pressure regulator built in. We were staying in a nice RV park in Moab, UT last fall that had the highest water pressure I've ever seen. The first time I hooked up the potable water hose and turned the supply on, the hose puffed up to about an inch in diameter! I didn't think much of it until it blew an end right off the hose! My guess is the pressure was probably between 100 and 150 psi, which is insanely high and way too much for a travel trailer. The internal regulator *probably* was doing it's job to protect the plumbing in our Airstream, but there was no way for me to tell, besides how could I know if the plumbing from the hose to the internal regulator wouldn't blow up? I ordered a regulator from Amazon and had it delivered the next day to the park. The pressure blew the end off another hose later that day.

The regulator is a Renator M11-0660R, which is adjustable. I put the regulator directly on the spigot and set the water pressure at 40 psi. My hoses and everything else was protected from the monster high pressure in the park. Never again will I hook up the water without a pressure regulator.
 

spasm3

Member
I never had an internal water pressure regulator, nor did I think it was all that important, because our Airstream has a pressure regulator built in. We were staying in a nice RV park in Moab, UT last fall that had the highest water pressure I've ever seen. The first time I hooked up the potable water hose and turned the supply on, the hose puffed up to about an inch in diameter! I didn't think much of it until it blew an end right off the hose! My guess is the pressure was probably between 100 and 150 psi, which is insanely high and way too much for a travel trailer. The internal regulator *probably* was doing it's job to protect the plumbing in our Airstream, but there was no way for me to tell, besides how could I know if the plumbing from the hose to the internal regulator wouldn't blow up? I ordered a regulator from Amazon and had it delivered the next day to the park. The pressure blew the end off another hose later that day.

The regulator is a Renator M11-0660R, which is adjustable. I put the regulator directly on the spigot and set the water pressure at 40 psi. My hoses and everything else was protected from the monster high pressure in the park. Never again will I hook up the water without a pressure regulator.
I just ordered a regulator, one like yours. I had a leak at the end of the season, water leaking into the bedroom from the water input. I think the campground over pressure damaged the input. It was leaking from the center, not either connection.

I replaced it today. I used geoseal to seal it to the sidewalk. Geoseal is not cheap, $22 a can. But you should never use it all. It's good to have on hand.
I pressure tested the new water inlet before attaching it back.
Pics below.

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spasm3

Member
I just started using one similar. A hydromaster. 45psi seems about right for the shower head to spray well.
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Wayne

Moderator
Staff member
Agreed - 45 psi is about right. However, the pressure limiter built into our trailer claims to be set at 40 psi and by the time it gets to the shower head, it's probably 35 psi, I wish it were a bit more.
 
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